Rock Residency kicked off with Hurry at Boot and Saddle

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The event consists of four shows on the last four Thursday nights in January. Each show supports a different local charity chosen by the artist.

Hurry performs the first week of Lame-O Records’ third annual Rock Residency event at Boot & Saddle on South Broad Street. Photo credit: Tom Beck

Philadelphia indie rock band Hurry kicked off Lame-O Records’ annual Rock Residency event at South Broad Street’s Boot & Saddle Thursday night. The event consists of four shows on the last four Thursday nights in January. Each show supports a different local charity chosen by the artist. Thursday night’s show supported the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society.

Eric Osman, founder of Lame-O, said that the event, which is in its third year, is an attempt to give back to the community.

“It’s just kind of the mission statement of the label,” he said. “It’s nice for the artists to match the values of the label.”

The remaining three shows of the event will be headlined by fellow Lame-O artists. Alternative rock band Steady Hands will headline the Jan. 17 show, indie rockers Slaughter Beach, Dog headlines the Jan. 24 performance, and on the night of Jan. 31, The Obsessives will be the main performer. The local charity for The Obsessives’ performance has yet to be determined. However, the Steady Hands concert will benefit the Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians

And the Slaughter Beach, Dog concert will benefit the Fund for the School District of Philadelphia.

When it was first founded by Osman six years ago, Lame-O Records always included community support in its mission.

“The label is local and community based,” he said. “We like to give money and donations to organizations that directly affect the community that we are in and apart of.”

According to Osman, the idea for a ‘community-based record company’ isn’t entirely new.

“It’s definitely a thing in record labels where they exist to be a part of and serve the community they’re in,” he said, “We didn’t invent that, unfortunately, but definitely labels like Dischord or Merge [are who] we’ve looked up to to understand the importance of the label being a community pillar.”